Intro Into the Essential Pieces of Hunting Equipment

When you’re out in the vast Australian wilderness and all you have to depend on for survival is what you’re carrying in your hunting pack, it’s really important to bring only that what’s necessary. While some people have the luxury of bringing all the equipment they need, others are quite limited, especially those traveling long distances by foot. The last thing you want is to be extremely fatigued by carrying around all that extra unnecessary hunting equipments that will only add to the weight of your backpack. For that very reason, I’ve compiled this list of the 5 hunting essentials that you shouldn’t leave home without.

First Aid Kit

 

When you’re out in the Australian backcountry, you have to be completely self-sufficient. Being able to deal with whatever you may encounter is crucial to your survival and having a pleasant hunting experience. Here are some of the things your first aid kit should include: bandages of various sizes, chapstick, hand sanitizer, cold, pain, and digestive meds, paracord, a lighter, water treatment drops, and duct tape. Of course, you can add things that you want to and that’s based on your personal needs.

Rain Gear

Depending on when and where you’re hunting, the rain gear you need will vary. Here in Australia, you’re going to need breathable and light rain gear for the most part, unless you’re hunting in areas with a colder climate. Rubberized and PVC type of rain gear is highly recommended, as it’s completely waterproof.

Knife

Knife

The need for this piece of hunting equipments is pretty straightforward. You need a durable, sharp and ergonomically designed knife that’s lightweight, full-tang and fixed. You can skin game with it, cut branches, prepare food, and everything in between. Avoid foldable knives, as they aren’t as durable as fixed ones, and avoid half-tang blades, as they are more prone to breaking than full tang ones.

Torch

Torch

A tactical torch can be one of the best items you own, not just for hunting, but for camping, hiking and every day carry as well. The torch you get should be made of tough materials so that it’s durable and water resistant, and it should be powerful enough to illuminate about a dozen metres ahead of you. Furthermore, it should be lightweight so that it doesn’t fatigue your arms after extended use.

Fire Starting Kit

Although you’ll probably have a lighter, a specialised fire starting kit can be extremely beneficial to have. The Gerber Bear Grylls fire starter is one of the most popular kits, as it’s compact, well-designed and easy to use.